Best Hashtags for Writers #writerslife #MFRWauthor

Best Hashtags for Writers #writerslife #MFRWauthor @kayelleallenWelcome to part two of a two-part series about using hashtags. Part one “What is a Hashtag” is found here. In this section, we’ll discuss the best hashtags for writers. Using hashtags to let readers know about the genres of our books is the #1 way writers use hashtags. In the banner on the left, notice the two embedded in the image: #ScifiRom and #KindleUnlimited. There are other ways to write those, including #SFR #SciFi #Romance and for the latter, #KU. It pays to know more than one and to know what is trending.

Best hashtags for writers

Find out which hashtag is being used most in your genre and use it. There are Twitter bots (legal) that pick up certain hashtags and retweet them to their followers. #SciFi is one of them. Make sure you’re using a hashtag that is actually in use already. If no one is searching for it, the hashtag is pointless. My favorite place to discover what the best hashtags for writers are at the moment is www.ritetag.com It’s free. I don’t use any hashtags till I’ve checked them out there.

Generally, use the single version of a word vs. the plural #book is better than #books for example. Check out this RiteTag listing of results for the word #romance:
https://ritetag.com/best-hashtags-for/romance

Other best hashtags for writers include #amwriting #amediting #MFRWauthor #writerslife #author — share yours in the comments.

A word about Triberr

First, let me say it’s Tri-berr not Tribb-er. It’s has 1 B and 2 Rs. Not Tribber – Triberr. Okay, stepping away from the soapbox…

The site Triberr is a blog amplifier. What that means is when you link your blog to the site, it allows other people to share your post with their social media. Try it for 30 days and you will not want to go back.

On Triberr, hashtags matter. You will gain a hundred-fold more readers with Triberr, so leverage that by using appropriate hashtags. Don’t add your own @name to the title. It will be included in every tweet that Triberr sends, even though you can’t see it on the site. Look at your mentions on Twitter and you will.

Should I use my name as a hashtag?

Is it better to write #KayelleAllen or @kayelleallen in a tweet? (fyi – the @kayelleallen is pronounced at-kayelleallen). These are referred to as mentions. (Mary mentioned you on Twitter means that Mary sent out a tweet that had your @name in it.

I don’t recommend using your name as a hashtag. Why not? You will get far more mileage from the @name because when anyone clicks that, it pops up a link so they can follow you. If they click it again, it takes them to your profile page. A hashtag with your name is only going to open a search for the name. It will not necessarily show your profile, which means it’s less likely to get you followers.

When you tweet, don’t add your own @name either. Obviously, if the tweet is from you, then the person can click your name since you are the sender. If your publicity person is talking about you, then yes, they should use your @name.

Don’t be afraid to use hashtags in your graphics. Especially branded graphics like the one below.

Best Hashtags for Writers #writerslife #MFRWauthor @kayelleallen

Hashtag Research

Here are three good links to check out for hashtag dos and don’ts:

https://blog.hootsuite.com/how-to-use-hashtags/
https://www.tintup.com/blog/7-examples-of-successful-hashtag-campaigns/
http://www.adweek.com/digital/ethan-martin-bukwild-guest-post-hashtags/


Putting hashtags to work

Now that you know what a hashtags are and how they work, what are you going to do with them? Do you have suggestions? What do you think are the best hashtags for writers? Please share in the comments.

 

About Kayelle Allen

Kayelle Allen did a tour in the US Navy, where she climbed around airplanes (on the ground of course) fixing black boxes that helped pilots find their way home. She wrote her first science fiction novel at 18, and to this day, it's hidden under the bed, where she vows it will remain. Gems from it, though, launched several series in her galaxy-wide universe of stories. From childhood, Kayelle was the victim of an overactive imagination and inherited the Irish gift of gab from her mother. From her father, she got a healthy respect for mechanical things. No wonder she writes Science Fiction and Fantasy peopled with crazy androids, mythic heroes and warriors who purr.
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